Recently introduced changes to section 72 of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 will affect most, if not all, organisations that utilise television broadcasts as part of their offering to customers. These amendments affect the public showing of TV broadcasts as previously section 72 allowed an exemption of the requirement for having the permission […]

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Has your business recently been audited or had a ‘royalty examination’ to verify your historical music use? Did you fully understand the process, your liabilities and the outcomes? Were you presented with an invoice for additional licence fees? If you run a business that plays music in public areas – bars, pubs, clubs, hotels, football […]

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It lasts for around 14 seconds, is the most recognised song in the English language, and has been translated into a further 18 languages.

Its tune is believed to have been composed by two American sisters in 1893, the value of the song alone was estimated at $5m when it was bought by Warner/Chappel Music in 1998, and it’s estimated to have amassed $50m in earnings since its creation.

It is, of course, Happy Birthday, the short-but-excruciating piece of music that nobody enjoys singing, and only children enjoy hearing.

It was also the subject of a legal royalties wrangle last year, at the end of which a judge in America ruled that the song was now, officially, in the public domain.

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